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A daily summary of segments aired on The O'Reilly Factor. A preview of the evening's rundown is posted here by 5 pm ET each weeknight.
Thursday, January 31, 2013
Parchments
Senator Robert Menendez in big trouble
Guests: Laura Ingraham

"59-year-old Democratic Senator Robert Menendez has been in the Senate for seven years and is now chair of the Foreign Relations Committee. Last April an anonymous source leveled allegations that Menendez took private trips to the Dominican Republic which he did not disclose as required by Senate rules. The accused also stated that Menendez and his friend Dr. Salomon Melgen hired underage Dominican prostitutes, but Senator Menendez denies that. Menendez has reimbursed $58,500 for the private jets, but there is no question that he broke Senate rules and the whole story is beginning to unravel. Menendez' office blames the allegations on a 'politically-motivated right wing blog,' referring to the Daily Caller website, which is run by Fox News contributor Tucker Carlson. All fair-minded Americans will presume that Senator Menendez is innocent until proven guilty of any criminal allegations. The evidence clearly shows that Menendez was not upfront about the jet trips, but that's a trifle compared to the underage prostitution allegation. This is a tough story to cover and we held it back for some time, but now the story has advanced far beyond the rumor stage. As an American, I hope Menendez did not have anything to do with exploiting children. I hope!"

The Factor discussed the Menendez situation with Fox News analyst Laura Ingraham. "If the allegations are true," she said, "he's going to have to step down. When you're a public official and elected by the people of your state, you have to hold yourself out as someone worthy of the trust of the public. The late payment for those jet trips notwithstanding, he violated Senate ethics rules by not reporting those as significant gifts. This reminds me a bit of the John Edwards story when one publication, the National Enquirer, was covering the story while everyone else stayed away from it." The Factor reiterated that Menendez, at minimum, appears to be guilty of financial malfeasance: "He took the trips in August and September of 2010 and reimbursed the government this month after the Daily Caller exposed the story."
Arab-American groups upset with Coca-Cola Super Bowl Ad
Guests: Nihad Awad

Some Arab groups are protesting a Super Bowl ad that features a man with camels in the desert. The Factor welcomed Nihad Awad of the Council on American-Islamic Relations. "I look forward to the Super Bowl and I enjoy watching the commercials," Awad said, "but I am not looking forward to seeing a commercial that has been deemed offensive by members of our community. It uses stereotypical images that I thought were behind us, it associates Arabs with camels, it's an old-fashioned approach to selling a product. There is a subconscious message depicting Arabs as unsuccessful and inept." Playing devil's advocate, The Factor suggested that Awad and others are overly sensitive: "There are camels in the desert, Arabs live in the desert, and it's just a dopey soda commercial. Why bother being offended by it?"
Proposed TN law would require schools to inform parents of homosexual activity
Guests: Gretchen Carlson and Jeanine Pirro

A Tennessee legislator is introducing a bill that would force public schools to tell parents if their children engage in homosexual activity. The Factor asked Culture Warriors Gretchen Carlson and Jeanine Pirro to opine. "This is discriminatory if you only tell the parents about gay activity," Carlson said, "but schools have the right to report on allsexual activity and they should." Pirro agreed that the law is unfair and discriminatory. "This legislator considers the act of homosexuality to be dangerous to a child's health and safety, but isn't the act of heterosexuality the same? What about pregnancy and STDs? Schools should be required to report what they consider to be child abuse and they should have to inform parents if they think a child is suicidal or depressed."
Colorado teacher in trouble over provocative Tweets
Guests: Megyn Kelly

23-year-old Colorado math teacher Carly McKinney is under investigation after tweeting salacious photos and posting comments about drugs. FNC anchor and attorney Megyn Kelly argued that McKinney is on shaky legal ground. "She can share these photos with her boyfriend," Kelly said, "but there's no reason to post them on line. And if she's an exhibitionist, she shouldn't become a teacher. The courts have held that teachers' First Amendment rights are somewhat limited if they reflect adversely on them or might cause a disruption in the class. She was tweeting about how she loves to be stoned or drunk, which is a private concern and gets the least amount of protection." The Factor made a pithy prediction: "She's gone!"
Another case of deceptive editing by NBC News?
Guests: Bernie Goldberg

MSNBC aired a video that had been edited to make it appear that gun rights advocates heckled the father of one of the Newtown victims. The Factor asked Bernie Goldberg to elaborate. "MSNBC is a repeat offender," he began, "and if you throw in NBC News, they've pulled off stunts like this three times in the past year. In this case Martin Bashir was trying to make gun people look bad with this kind of editing. You also had Andrea Mitchell and her staff doctoring a tape to make Mitt Romney look like an idiot and NBC News doctored a 9-1-1 tape to make George Zimmerman look like a racist. You have young left-wing producers masquerading as journalists who think there is nothing wrong with using the media to further their political agendas. Conservatives have been guilty of this too, and these people don't understand that even commentators have an obligation to be fair." The Factor concluded that NBC news bosses are ultimately responsible: "The brass at NBC doesn't know what goes on in the editing room, but I blame them for fostering this climate of unbelievable left-wing fanaticism."
Watters' World: Al Gore Edition
Guests: Jesse Watters

With Al Gore in New York hyping his new book, Jesse Watters set out on the streets of Manhattan to try and track down the portly former VP. Along the way, he spoke with a few of Big Al's supporters and detractors, who had these comments: "I like his innovative ideas regarding climate change" ... "He should have been the President" ... "He helped raise awareness about climate change" ... "I don't agree with how he makes his money, but it doesn't take away from the good work he's trying to do" ... "He's obviously more interested in money than in principle." Watters entered the No Spin Zone and described his very, very brief encounter with Gore at a book signing. "He tried to politely brush me off, but I told him we'd love to have him on and that he could sell a lot of books here. I don't think he's going to get back to us."
Viewers sound off
Factor Words of the Day
Zaven Sava, Sofia, Bulgaria: "Are you kidding me, Bill? Bob Beckel saying the economy is improving. How do you let him say that?"

Stephen Thompson, Yarmouth Port, MA: "The reason the president's approval rating is so high is all the free stuff his administration is giving out."

Gary LeVan, Harvest, AL: "The new slogan for the Democrats should be 'it doesn't matter.' That's what Bob Beckel said about the debt and Hillary Clinton said about the mixed messages from Benghazi."

Ryan Carter, Hurricane, UT: "This state has about the same amount of people as the city of Chicago where they have strict gun control laws. We don't have them. Strangely, Chicago's murder rate is ten times Utah's. It ain't about guns."
A riveting read
Check out Bill's latest column "What the Babies Would Say," which focuses on abortion and is available here on BillOReilly.com.
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