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A daily summary of segments aired on The O'Reilly Factor. A preview of the evening's rundown is posted here by 5 pm ET each weeknight.
Thursday, January 9, 2014
Parchments
The Factor Rundown
Talking Points Memo & Top Story
Personal Story Segment
Factor Follow Up Segment
Mad as Hell
Kelly File Segment
Back of the Book Segment
Factor Mail
Tip Of The Day
Comments
The War on Poverty
Guests: Jeanne Zaino & Robert Borosage
"Fifty years ago President Johnson announced that America would wage an intense war to lift millions out of poverty. His vision centered on giving folks a fair chance to develop their talents in order to make a good living. It was a noble idea, but analysis by the Heritage Foundation says nearly $21-trillion has been spent and the state of poverty in America has not really improved very much. All the social engineering has failed. In 2012 the feds spent $916-billion on 80 welfare programs that give cash assistance to about 100-million Americans. Those stats do not include Social Security and Medicare. Of course, welfare beneficiaries comprise a solid core of the Democratic Party, so we see the Dems ramping up for this year's election by promising even more benefits. But true poverty is driven by personal behavior, not an unfair economic system. In 1963 just 6% of American babies were born out of wedlock; now 41% are, and that includes 72% of African American babies. Single parent homes are four times more likely to be living in poverty and children raised by single parents are three times more likely to end up in prison. So maybe we should have a war against chaotic and irresponsible parents! But America will never launch that kind of war because it's too 'judgmental' and affects minority precincts. Therefore, cowardly politicians and race hustlers continue to bear false witness that our economic system is at fault rather than bad personal decision making. If you're dishonest, embrace intoxicants, conceive children you can't support, act in a crude way, and believe you are owed prosperity, then poverty may well come knocking. And all the President's men can't prevent that."

The Factor invited reaction from two prominent liberals. "Personal responsibility is important," said Professor Jeanne Zaino, "but if you do not address the structural and economic issues, personal responsibility won't change anything. The cost of college has skyrocketed, and you can be as responsible as you want, but if you can't get a college education you don't have the skills you need." Robert Borosage, head of a progressive think tank, contended that many poor people have actually improved their own personal responsibility. "People have gotten much more education and people are making responsible decisions by having fewer children because they can't afford them. It used to be that a rising tide would lift all boats, but starting in the mid 70's the tide kept rising but workers did not share in that. We don't have a problem of workers who are too lazy, we have the problem of jobs that don't offer good pay for hard work."
Bridge Scandal
Guest: Laura Ingraham
An apologetic New Jersey Governor Chris Christie has fired two aides who helped create a massive traffic jam to punish a Democratic mayor. FNC contributor Laura Ingraham gave her take on the scandal and Christie's Thursday press conference. "He did about as well as you can in these circumstances," she began, "and what you have to look at now is how he handles this going forward. The media has daggers out for Christie and this is obviously good news for Hillary Clinton or whoever the Democrats nominate. This is also a story about the Republican establishment - Christie has made a lot of enemies and there are a lot of people who would really like Jeb Bush to be the nominee. Christie has to decide whether he's going to be a punching bag or if he's going to go right to the people with a positive message of growth and prosperity."
Targeting Conservatives
Guests: Ellis Henican & Linda Chavez
The Department of Justice has assigned Barbara Bosserman, a donor to President Obama, to investigate allegations that the IRS singled out conservative Tea Party groups for harsh treatment. The Factor asked columnists Linda Chavez and Ellis Henican to opine. "You couldn't write this any better if it was a Saturday Night Live skit," Chavez said. "First you try to downplay the scandal and then you find somebody who is a big-time donor to the Obama campaign. It's unbelievable." But Henican found no problem with Bosserman's appointment. "There is nothing remotely wrong with what this lady did, let's judge her on her behavior. It would be improper to investigate her political background." The Factor concluded that the appointment gives at least the appearance of impropriety: "The Attorney General has a wide variety of people to investigate this, shouldn't he choose a neutral and independent person?"
Your Angry Viewer Emails
Guest: Heather Nauert
FNC anchor Heather Nauert fielded letters from some ticked-off viewers, among them Betty Vance of Illinois, who complained about the cost of having Michelle Obama remain in Hawaii for an extended vacation. "The overall cost of the trip is about $4-million," Nauert reported, "and most of that is attributed to the air travel. That's just standard among First Families, whether people like it or not. It will also cost about $430,000 in travel time just to fly her back." Virginian Jeffrey Day groused about local public schools being closed due to cold weather. "It was about seven degrees in Fairfax," Nauert said, "which is the coldest they've had in that area in about 20 years. Kids can get frostbite in about 30 minutes in that kind of temperature."
Shocking Video
Guest: Megyn Kelly
A video shot in Nebraska shows a black toddler spewing profanities at the behest of his relatives. Fox News anchor and attorney Megyn Kelly accused the adults in the video of criminal behavior. "This is child abuse," Kelly declared. "Child abuse can be physical and it can also be emotional, which is described as 'endangering the mental health of a child.' They had this little boy say the most vile things possible. The police union has also come under fire because they put this online as an example of the 'thug culture' they're dealing with." The Factor reported that social services has removed the boy and three other children from the abusive home.
Lone Survivor
Guest: Marcus Luttrell
Bill welcomed retired Navy Seal Marcus Luttrell, the sole survivor of a firefight with Taliban soldiers in 2005. Luttrell expressed dismay over the USA's unclear strategy in Afghanistan. "The villagers who saved my life are still there," he said, "so I worry about them constantly. When we first went over there the game plan was solid, we knew why we were fighting. But as the years progressed it's become frustrating not knowing what the end game is." Luttrell touted for the new movie "Lone Survivor," which tells his harrowing story. "I was a consultant on the film and the director and the cast and the crew did everything they possibly could to make sure the movie stayed true to form. It's a war movie and it's pretty gruesome." The Factor lauded Luttrell as "an example of American heroism."
Viewers sound off
Factor Words of the Day
Jennifer Munao, Washington Island, WI: "Those serving the public are not entitled to privacy on the job. So Robert Gates did nothing wrong."

Mark Hofman, Fayetteville, NC: "I am 12 and happy to say my parents do limit my gaming and net time. I am glad to live in the real world."

Julia Hayner, Macedon, NY: "I am 16 and see kids my age and younger posting pictures on Facebook of themselves drinking and smoking marijuana. It's very sad."
The Power of the Pen
In this age of emailing and texting, a handwritten note expressing gratitude to someone who has helped you will elevate both of you.
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