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A daily summary of segments aired on The O'Reilly Factor. A preview of the evening's rundown is posted here by 5 pm ET each weeknight.
Monday, September 17, 2012
Parchments
What's at stake in the presidential election
Guests: Irshad Manji and Harris Zafar

"Most Americans do not understand what is at stake in the upcoming election and there are three vital issues. First, the economy is terrible. But it's not just unemployment and low wages, it's the staggering amount of debt. President Obama rolled the dice, believing that record government spending in peacetime would lead to job creation. If the feds continue spending at this rate, the dollar will collapse. We must stop the massive borrowing, now estimated at $3.5 billion a day. Second, President Obama is using a 'soft power' approach to the Muslim world and has done everything he could to convince Muslims that America is not their enemy. Sadly, he has not convinced them and millions of Muslims continue to hate the USA. Even in the face of that, the Obama administration doesn't want to change course. Afghanistan is in peril, Iran is spitting in the eye of America, and al Qaeda is reconstituting in places like Yemen. Third, gas prices are through the roof and the nation has no coherent energy policy. Mr. Obama is well-intentioned in wanting alternative fuels, but his opposition to the fossil fuel industry has put working Americans in a very bad place. So there you have it, three vital issues that all voters should understand."

The question of the week: "Why do so many Muslims hate America?" The Factor posed it to author Irshad Manji and Harris Zafar of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community. "One reason is hypocrisy over democracy," Manji stated. "While America preaches democracy, it has propped up authoritarian leaders and has overthrown democratically elected ones. We're not talking about logic, we're talking about emotion, and I have never denied that there is a problem with the way we Muslims are practicing Islam." Zafar agreed that anti-American animus goes back many decades. "Since the 1950's there have been many crises in the Middle East and we have sided with the status quo governments, the dictators and kings, while disregarding the people who are being oppressed. The problem then becomes that current leaders keep reminding people of that to rile them up." The Factor posited that the widespread Muslim protests are indicative of a wider problem: "This is irrational, but it's on the level of millions and millions of people. They use their religion as an excuse and this is an out-of-control culture."
How will the Muslim chaos impact the presidential election?
Guests: Brit Hume

President Obama vowed that his election would engender a new spirit of cooperation between the U.S. and Muslims, but it hasn't quite worked out that way. Fox News analyst Brit Hume speculated as to how the Islamic protests could affect the November election. "American voters might ask what kind of policy it is," Hume surmised, "when we have an ambassador murdered, particularly one who was a friend to the Libyan uprising. That is shocking and distressing to Americans and when they hear the administration saying this is all the result of a crude little movie trailer, that doesn't make sense. The impact on the election will depend on how long this wave of violence continues." The Factor characterized the President's policies as woefully ineffective: "It doesn't look to me like any of the Muslim governments on this planet have stepped closer to the USA. President Obama did a massive outreach and they're basically giving him the finger around the world."
Are Democrats over-confident about Obama's reelection chances?
Guests: Kirsten Powers and Mary Katharine Ham

Some Democrats and Obama-friendly media analysts are implying that the President is a shoo-in for reelection. The Factor asked FNC analysts Kirsten Powers and Mary Katharine Ham to opine. "Confidence is good to project in a campaign," Ham said, "but getting too cocky can be problematic. The Democrats just spent their entire convention getting their base really excited; you don't want to then go on TV and say the election is a foregone conclusion." Powers advised her fellow Democrats to be cautious. "I don't know a lot of Democrats who think this is going to be a wipeout. Right now President Obama is doing well in the swing state polls, so I think there is reason for Democrats to feel confident. I would say he has the advantage, but I wouldn't say it's a slam dunk."
Jesse Watters hits NYC Fashion Week
Guests: Jesse Watters

FNC's Jesse Watters, dapper as always, spoke with the rich and beautiful during Fashion Week in New York City. He elicited a few tips from ultra-thin models: "It's all about hydrating, fruits and vegetables" ... "I run a lot, as much as I can" ... "90 minutes of hot yoga" ... "Bill O'Reilly seems to be in good shape to me, I don't know what he's doing but it seems to be working." Back in the studio, Watters concluded that many fashionistas are not exactly residing in the real world. "Katie Holmes debuted her fashion line," he reported, "and she's selling a black cape for $3,100. They're in such a bubble that they don't care, they don't know anything about Paul Ryan or Medicare. They're starving, they just want to eat!"
Clint Eastwood doesn't regret his RNC speech
Guests: Adam Carolla

The Factor was joined by radio host and comic Adam Carolla, who observed that Clint Eastwood is defending his empty chair routine at the Republican convention. "He's old, he's crazy, and that's fine," Carolla declared. "John Wayne used to speak to a hat rack for hours and no one said anything about it, it's just part of being old. I'm making fun of him because we can't make fun of fat people or Puerto Ricans anymore, all we have is old people." Carolla also commented on Occupy Wall Street, which marked its first anniversary with protests in Manhattan. "I love these guys, and now that they've fixed Wall Street they can move on to curing cancer and diabetes. They've all run out of momentum and they're back to their original movement, 'occupy futon.' This is all about people not having a daytime gig and having way too much free time on their hands."
Big Announcement involving O'Reilly and Jon Stewart
The Factor concluded Monday's show with a major announcement: "In order to illuminate the vital issues associated with the upcoming election, Jon Stewart and I will debate on Saturday, October 6th at George Washington University in D.C. We are calling it 'The Rumble in the Air-Conditioned Auditorium.' For $4.95 you can sign up for live streaming of the rumble at www.therumble2012.com. Stewart and I will discuss the intense issues of the day and then answer questions from the live audience and those watching on the Internet. We will donate 50% of the profits to a bunch of very worthy charities."
Viewers sound off
Factor Words of the Day
Fred Hickle, Tucson, AZ: "Could not agree with you more, Mr. O. No American should visit Egypt and we should cut off all aid."

Jane Sylvester, Hayward, CA: "Bill, you got it. I was considering going to Egypt later this year but, now, will not."

Jim Kercheval, Tucson, AZ: "Bill, your proposal to boycott Egypt is misguided and makes you out to be a crackpot. It would only hurt the people, not the government."
Book Mentions
Check out the books mentioned during this show.
Not Taco Bell Material
by Adam Carolla

Read more...
Allah, Liberty and Love: The Courage to Reconcile the Faith in Freedom
by Irshad Manji

Read more...
Do as you say
To help build character in young children, make sure you do what you say you're going to do. That simple philosophy - "do what you say you're going to do" - should be seared into the minds of all American children.
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