OPEN TO ALL: Analyzing Dr. Ford's and Judge Kavanaugh's Testimonies Start to Finish
By: Bill O'ReillySeptember 27, 2018
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No Spin News Summary – September 27, 2018

Dr. Christine Ford’s Testimony
In her first public statements, Christine Blasey Ford recounted details from her alleged encounter with the Supreme Court nominee when they were both teenagers. She claims he sexually assaulted her at a party during their high school years in the early 1980s.
Responding to a question from Sen. Patrick Leahy, (D-VT.), about how certain she was that it was Brett Kavanaugh who assaulted her, Ford looked directly at him and said, "100 percent."

Leahy asked his question in the context of a number of Kavanaugh supporters having proposed a theory that Ford may have actually been assaulted in the past but was mistaken about the identity of her attacker. Late Wednesday, the Judiciary Committee released information about two men who claimed they, not Kavanaugh assaulted Ford.

There have been many discrepancies in Ford’s testimony, beginning with Ford saying that she does not like to fly. She told friends her alleged assault by Brett Kavanaugh at a high school party more than 30 years ago has made her afraid of enclosed spaces, especially airplanes. Yet the college professor from California managed to board an airplane and travel to Hawaii, Costa Rica and the South Pacific for surfing vacations.

Then, a longtime friend of Ford’s, Leland Ingham Keyser, says she doesn’t know Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh and doesn’t recall attending a party with him. Ford said Keyser was at the party where Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were both in high school, but she says she has no memory of it. “Simply put, Ms. Keyser does not know Mr. Kavanaugh and she has no recollection of ever being at a party or gathering where he was present, with, or without, Dr. Ford,” Keyser’s lawyer, Howard Walsh, said in a statement.

Republicans Support Judge Kavanaugh
Emotionally battling to rescue his Supreme Court nomination, Brett Kavanaugh on Thursday denied allegations that he’d sexually assaulted Christine Blasey Ford when both were high school students and told Congress the accusations and biting criticism by Democrats had “totally and permanently destroyed” his family and reputation.

Sometimes showing anger, other times fighting back tears, the conservative jurist launched a bristling attack on the “national disgrace” of his treatment by Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee. Referring to the Constitution’s charge to senators in confirming high officials, he said, “You have replaced ‘advice and consent’ with ’search and destroy.”

Kavanaugh vowed to continue his effort to join the high court, to which President Donald Trump nominated him in July.

“You may defeat me in the final vote, but you’ll never get me to quit, never,” he said.

One of his accusers, Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, spoke and answered questions earlier in the day. She said she was “one hundred percent” certain that President Trump’s nominee was the man who attacked her when she was 15.

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), one of Kavanaugh’s most adamant defenders as he faced the allegations of sexual misconduct, ripped Democrats in a furious speech for engaging in the “most unethical sham” he’s seen in his entire political career.

The first Republican senator aside from Grassley to speak, Graham seemed like he was unloading anger that had been pent up for days.

“This is the most unethical sham since I’ve been in politics,” Graham said, facing a row of stone-faced Senate Democrats.

And facing directly toward Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), Graham vowed: “To my Republican colleagues, if you vote no, you’re legitimizing the most despicable thing I have seen in my time in politics.”

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